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It’s a different era and a different world today and I think everything is changing, the whole system of fashion and design and I think there’s an opportunity for everyone to create and do something that is different and individual. I think it’s a really interesting thing and how it all correlates to the industry and how it’s all evolving. -Alexander Wang
Alexander Wang on his thoughts on fast fashion as he preps for a H&M x Alexander Wang Collaboration (coming to market on Nov.6th. 

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Sunday Read: “For many organizations, interaction with the outside word quickly becomes their most profitable opportunity”. I often wonder why companies and brands working in an industry, like fashion for example,  often operate the same? They often use the same photogs, same stylist, same messaging-all elements of #marketing their product. They often use the same insulated ‘insider’ tactics. They often care about the opinions of their contemporaries & colleagues  than those of the customer. They often copy the traditional institutional best practices without consideration and calculation if [it] works for their respective organizations. All of this mirroring of each other, cannibalizes each  organizations’ market & brand effectiveness.  I’ve learned that every successful #business organization looks to separate themselves from the crowd and not looked to be accepted by the crowd. The only crowd that matters is the customer-the outside world.  | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #business in #fashion,  #music,  #art, & beyond.

Sunday Read: “For many organizations, interaction with the outside word quickly becomes their most profitable opportunity”. I often wonder why companies and brands working in an industry, like fashion for example, often operate the same? They often use the same photogs, same stylist, same messaging-all elements of #marketing their product. They often use the same insulated ‘insider’ tactics. They often care about the opinions of their contemporaries & colleagues than those of the customer. They often copy the traditional institutional best practices without consideration and calculation if [it] works for their respective organizations. All of this mirroring of each other, cannibalizes each organizations’ market & brand effectiveness. I’ve learned that every successful #business organization looks to separate themselves from the crowd and not looked to be accepted by the crowd. The only crowd that matters is the customer-the outside world. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #business in #fashion, #music, #art, & beyond.

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This morning activities at #Supreme with the In-Store release of the #Supreme x #Nike Air #Foamposite One, reminded us of this quote from #TimothyFerris. Some of the fundamentals of #Marketing are the development of a brand’s 4Ps- Understanding Product, Place, Price & Promotion. Brands that use the 4Ps marketing mix model to guide their #business strategy & corresponding #marketing strategy, tend to know how to play at the hearts, minds, & pockets of their target customer; the 4Ps helps a business and it’s brand(s) maintain the ebb & flow with customers ever changing fickle tastes. It helps them also create better understanding of how to create intelligent Supply &  how to create more frenzied Demand.

#Supreme & #Nike do a great job creating Perceived Value for their audiences. Shorting Supply, Exaggerating Demand, Creating Social Context, & more. We humans use brands to define ourselves, to express an appreciation for esthetics, for esteem, for displaying status & more. Understanding your customer helps you develop the 4Ps,  which in turn helps you create the kind of tribal Demand that makes David beat Goliath. Or In this case gives David more leverage in working with Goliath. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #business in #fashion, #music, #art, & beyond.

This morning activities at #Supreme with the In-Store release of the #Supreme x #Nike Air #Foamposite One, reminded us of this quote from #TimothyFerris. Some of the fundamentals of #Marketing are the development of a brand’s 4Ps- Understanding Product, Place, Price & Promotion. Brands that use the 4Ps marketing mix model to guide their #business strategy & corresponding #marketing strategy, tend to know how to play at the hearts, minds, & pockets of their target customer; the 4Ps helps a business and it’s brand(s) maintain the ebb & flow with customers ever changing fickle tastes. It helps them also create better understanding of how to create intelligent Supply & how to create more frenzied Demand.

#Supreme & #Nike do a great job creating Perceived Value for their audiences. Shorting Supply, Exaggerating Demand, Creating Social Context, & more. We humans use brands to define ourselves, to express an appreciation for esthetics, for esteem, for displaying status & more. Understanding your customer helps you develop the 4Ps, which in turn helps you create the kind of tribal Demand that makes David beat Goliath. Or In this case gives David more leverage in working with Goliath. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #business in #fashion, #music, #art, & beyond.

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How I Collect: Cultural Entrepreneur Stefan Simchowitz on the Merits of Flipping, and Being a "Great Collector" | Artspace

I recently came across an excellent article on Artspace.com highlighting keen insights from whom I believe to be one of the art world’s most polarizing figures - Stefan Simchowitz.  In the piece, Mr. Simchowitz gives, in my opinion, a well-rounded and very candid ‘state-of-the-day’ analysis of the current art market landscape.  

As a an avid collector, art advisor, and self-proclaimed “cultural entrepreneur,” Mr.Simchowitz offers sagacious advice on understanding and navigating the art market with consideration to present day realities such as the proliferation of art through social media, and institutional ‘group think.’ 

He lends his advice to a range of diverse ‘actors’ in the art world - from galleries trying to get a foothold in a post-internet art era, to young tech mavericks - displeased with the ‘trappings’ of the traditional art system - but eager to move from spectator to buyer.  

Overall, if you participate in the art world - whether you’re an artist, art advisor, art dealer, gallerist, collector (budding or established), or spectator - I think you’ll benefit from reading this article, or, at the very least, relate to something in it. 

Below are excerpts of what I believe to be some of the more salient points from the piece.  But feel free to read it in its entirety for a more personal angle.

The Impact of The Internet on The Art World

”[…] there’s much less friction for the spectator to experience the artwork. More people see the art, more people can consume it and engage with it, and, more importantly, many more people have started taking and sharing photos and describing what they’re seeing. These posts aren’t in a descriptive format like a critical review, but they’re microbursts of cultural criticism that can balloon to be seen by a multitude of people.

So one artwork can be encountered by 20 people, but if they capture an image of it and distribute it then the viewership can become exponentially larger. In this way, the curator, the critic, and the context become fragmented, and we go from a hierarchical system that’s controlled from the top to a system that’s more like a beehive, where many people performing very simple actions can be aware of each other and create an organism that is actually extremely intelligent and able to achieve huge results. This is changing the way culture is distributed and marketed and thought about, which I think is pretty radical.”

Using Social Media:  A Tactical Example

”[…] it’s not so much about speaking to a mass of 10,000 people, but rather being followed by key decision-makers, players, and collectors in that network. […] what I call ‘curated social media,’ […] essentially a very inexpensive way to have an editorial platform that people can follow. Instagram has been an extension of that, and I use it less to directly market artists than to create some kind of narrative around their work.”

Choosing Clients As an Art Advisor

"I think you need a very widely distributed clientele, with everyone from the very rich to people who need to stretch to buy an artwork. You want to mix it up, like a school—you want diversity, as opposed to the traditional system, which is just looking for the super rich and famous clients. Advisors like that end up becoming inbred in their distribution. I think if you create diversity then you’re able to create a much healthier and more profound mechanism for cultural distribution."

Choosing Art:  Ideas on What to Look For 

"I look to identify a movement, and I look to identify macro-trends. What is going on in the world? How is the world changing? What are the power shifts at play? The world is constantly in flux and constantly in a period of hierarchy-restructuring. The key is to understand what exogenous factors enter a marketplace and will change it."

The Post-Internet Artist

”[…] I think their distribution and their cultural profiles are much broader and exist outside of the traditional networks of distribution and control as they are centered in New York and London. […] these young guys who are well known but who aren’t coming through the [traditional] system […]”

'Flipping” in the Art Market

"I believe in the trading infrastructure of the market, and I believe in inexpensive channels for art that allow it to get redistributed and redistributed and redistributed with great virality. If I sell you something for a dollar and you sell it to your mate for two dollars and he sells it to his mate for four dollars, and he sells it to his mate for eight dollars, and he sells it to his mate for 10—well, that’s five collectors who bought the work, discussed the work, studied the work, and made a profit from it. And then they feel good about investing in cultural production, which is a very difficult thing to do because art, at the end of the day, has no value.

So, the more confidence you can bring to the system, the better it is for the system.”

posted by Kwasi Gyasi of MyUberLife 

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I find mediocrity hard, I find that whole area difficult as I care very much about what I do.-Phoebe Philo
Words from Celine’s Creative Director Phoebe Philo. We agree. Put your all into your work. 

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Living Like This: What we explain to many of our colleagues who don’t work in cultural consumer markets like #fashion, #music a/o #art, and who don’t quite understand why so many people are enamoured by it, is that they can not evaluate these cultural phenomenon the same way they evaluate oil futures or traded stocks. Markets are powered by people and people are powered but what they feel. The power of fashion, music, & art, is that it provides people armour against life, it provides sentiment, identity & a new definition of self. It provides a medium to communicate to the world our beliefs visually & sonically, it provides a new value system . It provides energy. Energy , Love & Power .The love of fashion, music, & art have empowered so many the opportunity to express CHANGE-Change in their beliefs, tastes, sentiments, cultures, personal dispositions,social positions & more. If you run a business and are apart of change and you’re on the pulse of societal change, you will always have more than change in your bank accounts. Fashion, music, & art are the lifestyle lenses into people. Without people their are no markets to market to and without understanding people, marketing is useless. Without seeing value in #fashion, #music, & #art, products stay products & products without a lifestyle lens, is just a boring commodity. | #MULFMAB 4 #fashion, #music, #art, & #business

Living Like This: What we explain to many of our colleagues who don’t work in cultural consumer markets like #fashion, #music a/o #art, and who don’t quite understand why so many people are enamoured by it, is that they can not evaluate these cultural phenomenon the same way they evaluate oil futures or traded stocks. Markets are powered by people and people are powered but what they feel. The power of fashion, music, & art, is that it provides people armour against life, it provides sentiment, identity & a new definition of self. It provides a medium to communicate to the world our beliefs visually & sonically, it provides a new value system . It provides energy. Energy , Love & Power .The love of fashion, music, & art have empowered so many the opportunity to express CHANGE-Change in their beliefs, tastes, sentiments, cultures, personal dispositions,social positions & more. If you run a business and are apart of change and you’re on the pulse of societal change, you will always have more than change in your bank accounts. Fashion, music, & art are the lifestyle lenses into people. Without people their are no markets to market to and without understanding people, marketing is useless. Without seeing value in #fashion, #music, & #art, products stay products & products without a lifestyle lens, is just a boring commodity. | #MULFMAB 4 #fashion, #music, #art, & #business

1 Notes

Music Marketing: A Way To Make It InThe Music Industry

During my morning walk to Whole-foods. I came across a powerful article in the Huff Post Ent section. The article below serves as a good basis for any active or aspiring musician. This article provides great business, marketing, legal & other tactical insight; will be of value to all musicians active in today’s music environment and economic reality.

See below:  

How She Made It In The Music Industry: Music Marketing by Indie-Artist Kellee Maize


2014-03-24-kelleemaizelivenepal.jpg

First off, by “Made It,” I don’t mean filling up arenas or the sort of unlimited abundance that could “make it rain” everyday. I mean making music a full-time focus that pays bills, so that you can start doing what you love.

With all of this talk about Female Hip Hop Artists failing in the music industry andless and less female rappers being signed, I have been inspired to write this article and share what worked and what didn’t … and a LOT didn’t. I’m still applying these new discoveries myself and learning everyday from them, so I can make no guarantees, but my hope is that this helps a next generation of conscious artists trying to let their voices be heard.

Who am I?

I am an unsigned rapper and singer from Pittsburgh. With Licensing, Shows, MP3 Sales, and a Toyota Hybrid Sponsorship, I can do music full-time and focus on evolving my sound and my SELF, building a team and working more in my community. Most importantly, I am building a fan base. (I don’t really like the word “fan” and prefer supporters or better yet community, but for simplicity sake, we will say fan and fan base here in this article.)

So … let’s begin … My 10 Tips to “Make It” In the Music Industry …


1. Don’t Do Free Shows

I love to perform and connect with people, I’ve probably done around 150 free shows over the years. It’s amazing practice, but once you get to a point where you feel like you have confidence in creating an engaging live show, I suggest not continuing to do it without some compensation. Unless of course it’s for a cause you care about, it can be a lot of effort and time that does not amount to very much tangible support. The sound systems at most shows asking you to perform for free could also be a poor representation of your voice and generally folks won’t know your music, so there will be little engagement. Especially if you are a rapper, your lyrics might be too hard understand.

You may get a few die hard fans from a show, but that same effort you put into an online marketing campaign could yield thousands of new die hard supporters. At the same time, I don’t suggest not performing for more than a month or two, to keep you limber and in touch.




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2. Don’t Contact Music Blogs

Smaller music blogs (that are still influential) like Gorilla vs Bear, Pigeons and Planesor Pretty Much Amazing get about 10,000 visits and 200 music submissions a day. How are you supposed to make your email to them stand out?

Continue reading…

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Discussing: Cultural phenomena & trend and how they are fueled by the socioeconomic realities of people and customers to media and industry insiders all way out to pure chaos theory. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #market inference & intelligence. #Normcore #fashion #music #art #lifestyle

Discussing: Cultural phenomena & trend and how they are fueled by the socioeconomic realities of people and customers to media and industry insiders all way out to pure chaos theory. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #market inference & intelligence. #Normcore #fashion #music #art #lifestyle

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Discussing: CEO and founder Richard Hayne of#UrbanOutFitters' new business strategy and how it's important for companies to get the internet, get culture & most importantly, get the culture of their target audience. When companies invest heavily in technology & invest heavily in market intelligence, the company gains & maintains it’s unique selling proposition, all connected to the hearts, minds, & pockets of the customer. 

The company’s with a “tech savvy investment culture,” a view that is shared by Morgan Stanley analysts, one can argue that those companies can use its analytics capabilities & market intelligence to “powerfully engage shoppers,” “improve data-driven decisions” and reduce “fashion risk.” Word. |#MULFMAB4 $mart #business in #fashion, #music, #art, & beyond.

Discussing: CEO and founder Richard Hayne of#UrbanOutFitters' new business strategy and how it's important for companies to get the internet, get culture & most importantly, get the culture of their target audience. When companies invest heavily in technology & invest heavily in market intelligence, the company gains & maintains it’s unique selling proposition, all connected to the hearts, minds, & pockets of the customer.

The company’s with a “tech savvy investment culture,” a view that is shared by Morgan Stanley analysts, one can argue that those companies can use its analytics capabilities & market intelligence to “powerfully engage shoppers,” “improve data-driven decisions” and reduce “fashion risk.” Word. |#MULFMAB4 $mart #business in #fashion#music#art, & beyond.

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via http://fundersandfounders.com/  


This is important information for any individual / team that is inspiring to create their idea into a business to understand the basics of funding your startup. This illustration provides a good breakdown of the process from the beginning to end; from Idea Stage to Funding Rounds to IPO. 



Posted by Winston Peters

via http://fundersandfounders.com/


This is important information for any individual / team that is inspiring to create their idea into a business to understand the basics of funding your startup. This illustration provides a good breakdown of the process from the beginning to end; from Idea Stage to Funding Rounds to IPO.

Posted by Winston Peters

3 Notes

Indeed: Wise words from the King of the #Trill, #Amazon founder & CEO, Jeff Bezos on what $mart companies & brands do to gain and maintain their competitive advantage. Ironically,  $mart companies focus on the customer more than they focus on what competitors do. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #business in #fashion, #music, #art, & beyond. #MyUberLife  (at Neuehouse)

Indeed: Wise words from the King of the #Trill, #Amazon founder & CEO, Jeff Bezos on what $mart companies & brands do to gain and maintain their competitive advantage. Ironically, $mart companies focus on the customer more than they focus on what competitors do. | #MULFMAB 4 $mart #business in #fashion, #music, #art, & beyond. #MyUberLife (at Neuehouse)

3 Notes

6 Mistakes to Avoid When Taking Your Brand Global.

by CHRISTIAN ARNO

Good Read and a lot of take aways for fashion brands & creatives looking to do business abroad and here in the US.

It’s exciting to take a business onto the international stage, targeting global customers and new opportunities. However, in your hurry to reach them before your competitor does, it’s all too easy to overlook some of the finer points of internationalization.

Unfortunately, it’s these same details that can make or break an overseas campaign. Even some of the largest brands have discovered this to their cost.

Looking at what they did wrong and what others have done right can be useful when it comes to reviewing your own global marketing strategy.

Mistake #1: Failure to Adapt to Local Markets

The most successful global businesses understand the importance of being relevant to their local markets.

That’s why you can now buy a KFC rice bucket in Singapore. Likewise, you’ll find pasta dishes on the McDonald’s menu in Italy and the chain has now opened the first of a planned 500 or so meat-free restaurants in India.

You don’t need to be in the restaurant business to see the benefit of appealing to local culture, while avoiding marketing angles that might offend local values and religious beliefs.

Mistake #2: Brand Names That Don’t Translate

The public loves to laugh at brand names that mean something unflattering or off-color when translated. Japanese sports drink Pocari Sweat is just one of many casualties of this.

Similarly, the scenic connotations of Microsoft’s Vista made quite a different impact in Latvia. Here the word equates to “hen” and is also used to refer to a dowdy woman.

The difficulty with this is it’s often not obvious to non-native speakers of that language and by the time the mistake has been caught, there’s already an expensive marketing campaign underway.

Mistake #3: Keyword Translation Issues

The right keywords mean search traffic will be well matched to your service or product, and more likely to buy. However, a dictionary or Web translation won’t always provide the best word for a specific product.

Regional usage where different countries share a language can also be a problem. Orange juice brand Tropicana ran into this challenge when marketing “jugo de china.” While the term had been correct for their orange juice campaign in Puerto Rico, it fell flat with Cubans in Florida. To them, it meant “juice from China.”

On top of using keyword research tools with country and language filters, it’s always a good strategy to double-check with a native speaker that you’ve found the best choice.

Mistake #4: Not Treating Local Markets as Separate Campaigns

A monolingual Twitter or Facebook account is simply not enough to connect with worldwide customers, still less to make them feel valued.

Instead, tailor each campaign for its target country or region. That means not only publishing content in the language of that audience but keeping it relevant to their interests. Creating separate social media accounts and using the market’s own preferred platforms is the best way to do this.

These might include Google+, Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest - all now major networks worldwide. Video also has an almost universal appeal, although Youku Tudou and 56.com are alternatives to YouTube if marketing to China.

Regional social networks can also play a key role. For example, companies are using messaging service LINE to reach out to its users in Japan: a number that had reached47 million registered users by August 2013. Given their worldwide success, it’s no surprise to learn that Coca-Cola is one of the global businesses that was quick to get on board.

Mistake #5: Insufficient Research Into Local Culture

Creating a campaign that attracts attention begins with thorough research into cultural preferences. For instance, the colorful and visually exciting campaigns that create a buzz in Asia often need a redesign to appeal to Western markets.

Regional differences can also affect conversion rates. For example, while Germans will happily buy consumer electronics online, a 2012 Accenture study showed that a significant majority of Russians, Chinese, and Japanese shoppers prefer to visit a retail store.

Payment preferences also need consideration. Not all countries have high usage of credit cards. Some, such as Canadians, prefer to use debit cards. Others prefer to buy with checks or via online services such as PayPal.

Mistake #6: Failure to Adapt for Mobile

With mobile devices now so much a part of our lives, no online business can afford to neglect its mobile presence.

To avoid having a mobile-unfriendly site that sends potential customers to your competitors, get up to speed on the best way to meet the needs of mobile users. These include responsive design elements, large tap targets, and keeping the bandwidth load light. Keep up to date too with voice search trends.

The term “mobile” covers a broad range of devices and different platforms such as Android, iOS, and Windows. Test your site across as many of these as possible.

Pay attention to regional differences and changing trends now and you will lay a firm foundation for future success with international customers

This article originally published at ClickZ here

395 Notes

You cannot be really first-rate at your work if your work is all you are.
Anna Quindlen's Short Guide to a Happy Life – her fantastic cancelled Villanova commencement address on work, joy, and how to live rather than exist. (via explore-blog)

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